Maybe It’s Not You!

Maybe-its.pngYou may have a great elevator speech/pitch for an editor, but that doesn’t mean it will be accepted. Don’t take it personal. There are many reasons your work is rejected,
and they have nothing to do with your writing or how it’s presented. Take heart and don’t give up.

Common reasons for rejection

  1.  The editor has too much on their plate. They are only human just like the rest of us. They may really like your work but just not have the time to pursue it. They could request that you wait until they have the time to give your work their full attention, but that wouldn’t be fair to you. In reality, they would be asking you to put everything on hold and inhibit you from pitching to another editor.
  2.  The piece isn’t a good fit for that particular editor. Know what they are looking for.
  3.  The Editor has insider info. In the past editors could post what they wanted, but these days, authors do surveys, interviews, and talk to focus groups. In order for a publication to be successful, the editor has to provide what their reader is looking for.
  4.  The concept lacks originality. You can do a simple google search to find out how original your great idea really is.
  5.  The editor may be afraid to gamble on your skills, especially if you’re new. Have that great pitch, but also have that article or piece of work complete so the editor knows you’re serious and can complete what you have started.

This list was provided by an editor at Writer’s Digest. Her focus was on magazine/publication articles, however, these reasons for rejection also apply to novels.

I would take a good look at that elevator speech to make sure I’m presenting my work in the best light. If the speech/pitch is sound, maybe it’s not your work. Consider moving on to the next editor on your list.

Something to think about.

-Jan R

 

Maybe-its.png

Maybe It’s Not You!

How’s That Elevator Speech Coming?

images-2If you don’t have that elevator speech, you need to start thinking about it. Just because your plans don’t include a writer’s conference in the near future, doesn’t mean you don’t need one. I definitely don’t want you to fall into the same trap I did. Very embarrassing 🙂

I attended a work conference with my husband several years ago. It was a great getaway for me and a chance to focus on my novel without the distractions of home. Needless to say, I was enjoying myself and making some significant progress.

I was asked to join my husband and some of his peers for supper the evening before we were scheduled to leave. I was surrounded by men talking shop, so all I had to do was smile and display exemplary dining skills-or so I thought.

About halfway through the meal, one of the men looked over at me and said, “Your husband told us what you do during the day while he is at the conference. We would love to hear a little more about your book. What’s it about?”

Well, I froze. My mind went totally blank. It was all I could do to control my suddenly out of whack emotions, as I turned to face this man who had the audacity to ask me such a question.

I wasn’t prepared. I didn’t have an Elevator Speech. I didn’t think I needed one. My novel was complete, but it wasn’t ready for prime time.

I have that Elevator Speech now. I felt foolish and was totally caught off guard by men who were only trying to include me in the conversation. You never know when you’ll come across someone who’ll ask you what your book is about.

I’ll be prepared the next time. Plus, it will give me practice for when I do attend that writing conference or get the opportunity to speak to an agent/author I just happened to run into at the airport.

Some things to keep in mind :

  • Remember when you are crafting your speech, you are talking to another human being.
  • You only have 30-60 seconds. Don’t try to tell them the entire story.
  • Content is as important as delivery. It doesn’t matter if it’s well delivered if it’s boring and uninspiring. Make them want to hear more!
  • If you are attending a conference, you don’t want to accost agents/editors-wait for an invite or an appropriate opening. They know why you are there. Introduce yourself. Engage in small talk, they will usually ask.
  •  Practice, practice, practice. You don’t want to memorize every word and sound like a robot or like you’re reading a teleprompter, but you do want your Elevator Speech to flow and be cohesive. You want it to sound natural.
  • Always be prepared and show passion.

If you haven’t prepared your speech, you need to start working on it. It’s just a matter of time. Somebody is going to ask.

-Jan R

 

How’s That Elevator Speech Coming?

Elevator Speech?

images-2I attended a conference with my husband this past week. It was a great get away for me and a chance to focus on my novel without the distractions of home. Needless to say I was enjoying myself and making some significant progress.

I was asked to join my husband and some of his peers for supper the evening before we were scheduled to leave. I was surrounded by men talking shop, so all I had to do was smile and display exemplary dining skills-or so I thought.

About half way through the meal, one of the men looked over at me, and said, “Your husband told us what you do during the day while he is at the conference. We would love to hear a little more about your book. What’s it about?”

Well, I froze, my mind went totally blank, and it was all I could do to control my suddenly out of whack emotions, as I turned to face this man who had the audacity to ask me such a question.

I wasn’t prepared. I didn’t have an Elevator Speech. I didn’t think I needed one. My novel is complete, and I am in the revision process, but it’s not ready for prime time.

I’m working on that Elevator Speech now. I felt foolish and was totally caught off guard. You never know when you’ll come across someone who will ask you what your book is about. I’ll be prepared the next time. Plus, it will also give me practice for when I do attend that writing conference, or get the opportunity to speak to an agent/author I just happened to run into at the airport.

Some things to keep in mind :

  • Remember when you are crafting your speech, you are talking to another human being.
  • You only have 30-60 seconds. Don’t try to tell them the entire story.
  • Content is as important as delivery. It doesn’t matter if it’s well delivered if it’s boring and uninspiring. Make them want to hear more!
  • If you are attending a conference, you don’t want to accost agents/editors-wait for an invite or an appropriate opening. They know why you are there. Introduce yourself. Engage in small talk, they will usually ask.
  •  Practice, practice, practice. You don’t want to memorize every word and sound like a robot or like you’re reading a teleprompter, but you do want your Elevator Speech to flow and be cohesive. You want it to sound natural.
  • Always be prepared and show passion.

If you haven’t prepared your speech, you need to start working on it. It’s just a matter of time . Somebody is going to ask.

-Jan R

 

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Elevator Speech?